Conference Schedule

2017 MICATA Conference Schedule

Click on session descriptions and presenter names to access descriptions and bios.


Friday, March 24

Pre-conference Workshop 1 

Workshop Title: Advanced-Level SDL Studio Seminar
Facilitator: Jeana Clark
Time: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: RC Room 144

Pre-conference Workshop 2

Workshop Title: Prepare for the ATA Certification Exam (E>S)
Facilitators: Rudy Heller and Diego Mansilla
Time: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: RC Room 146

Conference Welcome Reception

Time: 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location: RC 270


Saturday, March 25

Continental Breakfast and Registration

Time: 7:45 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
Location: Atrium

Welcome Remarks

Presenter: Christina Wolff
Time: 8:30 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.
Location: NM Hudson Auditorium

Plenary Session

Plenary Title: Professionalizing: Find your Place in the Industry
Presenter: Karen Tkaczyk
Time: 8:45 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
Location: NM Hudson Auditorium

Morning Break

Time: 9:45 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Location: Atrium

Concurrent Session 1
All times: 10:00 a.m. to 10:55 a.m.

Translator Session
Session Title: ATA Certification Exam Preparation
Presenters: Rudy Heller and Diego Mansilla
Location: RC Room 101A

Interpreter Session
Session Title: Note-Taking for Consecutive Interpreting (Continues in Session 2)
Presenter: Ernest Nino-Muncia
Location: NM Hudson Auditorium

Tools & Business Session
Session Title: Starting Up Your Own Business
Presenter: Jeana Clark
Location: RC Room 101B

Concurrent Session 2
All times: 11:00 a.m. to 11:55 a.m.

Translator Session
Session Title: Planning Effective Translator Training
Presenter: Jason Jolley
Location: RC Room 101A

Interpreter Session
Session Title: Note-Taking for Consecutive Interpreting (Continued from Session 1)
Presenter: Ernest Nino-Muncia
Location: NM Hudson Auditorium

Tools & Business Session
Session Title: Improving the Quality of your Translation Business
Presenter: John Matthews
Location: RC Room 101B

Luncheon

Time: Noon to 1:30 p.m.
Luncheon Talk Title: Differences in Anime and Manga Translation
Presenter: Angela Tamae Liu
Location: RC Room 101C

Concurrent Session 3
All times: 1:30 p.m. to 2:25 p.m.

Translator Session
Session Title: El signo lingüístico y la traducción: la relación entre el significante y el significado
Presenter: Priscila Palomino Piper
Location: RC Room 101A

Interpreter Session
Session Title: Introduction to the Perioperative Process and Protocols for Medical Interpreters
Presenter: Wyman Borts, Jr
Location: NM Hudson Auditorium

Tools & Business Session
Session Title: Getting Started in the T&I Industry
Presenters: Gabby Doherty and Jean Marie Trujillo
Location: RC Room 101B

Concurrent Session 4
All times: 2:30 p.m. to 3:25 p.m.

Translator Session
Session Title: Translation and Transcreation for Public Health
Presenter: Eva de Vallescar
Location: RC Room 101A

Interpreter Session
Session Title: Advanced Terminology Workshops for Medical Interpreters and Translators
Presenter: Wyman Borts, Jr
Location: NM Hudson Auditorium

Tools & Business Session
Session Title: A Lucrative Sideline: Editing Non-Native English Scientific Writing
Presenter: Karen Tkaczyk
Location: RC Room 101B

Afternoon Break

Time: 3:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.
Location: Atrium

Concurrent Session 5
All times: 3:45 p.m. to 4:40 p.m.

Translator Session
Session Title: Healthcare and Language Access
Presenter: Susan Garret
Location: RC Room 101A

Interpreter Session
Panel Title: Can you Hear Me Now? Practical Aspects, Techniques, and Modes of Interpretation
Presenters: Janja Pavetic-Dickey, Rosario Garriga, and Birgit Scherer-Wiedmeyer
Location: NM Hudson Auditorium

Tools & Business Session
Session Title: Understanding Legalese in the Immigration Court
Presenter: Angie Williams
Location: RC Room 101B

Conference Wrap-Up

Time: 4:45 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: NM Hudson Auditorium

Dinner

On your own. Go out with friends!


Sunday, March 26

ATA Certification Examination

Time: The exam begins at 9:00 a.m. Registered test-takers should arrive by 8:30 a.m.
Location: RC Room 183

Please note: Separate registration is required with the ATA for the examination. Please visit
www.atanet.org/certification/index.php or call (703) 683-6100 to register.


Session Descriptions and Presenter Bios

Advanced-Level SDL Studio Seminar

Jeana M. Clark will lead and moderate this advanced-level seminar in SDL Trados Studio.  All translators who are familiar with any recent version of SDL Studio are invited to attend regardless of their level of expertise, and the focus of the seminar will be for participants to share their insights and skills in this powerful translation-memory software package.  It will be an interactive session of experienced translators sharing the unique and interesting “tricks of the trade” that they have learned through their years of using this software, and a session where we will all grow in our abilities in using this software.  Come prepared to share your experiences, ask questions about what you find daunting, and offer some examples of unique and interesting insights that make your translating process smoother and more profitable. (return to top)

Jeana M. Clark is an ATA-certified German>English translator, solopreneur, educator, and experienced non-profit leader. As a certified SDL Trados user, she loves sharing her CAT-tool passion with experienced colleagues and mentoring newbies. Always looking for a challenge, she is currently chairing two boards, the Iowa Interpreters and Translators Association and a non-profit, fair trade retailer in her hometown. When she is not teaching upper-level management and marketing courses at her alma mater, translating, or being “mom taxi,” you’ll probably find her at the gym teaching Zumba classes, enjoying mixed martial arts or driving her motorcycle. (return to top)


Prepare for the ATA Certification Exam (E>S) / Translation Bash

Two ATA English-into-Spanish graders will lead a 6-hour workshop divided into a morning session (“Prepare for the ATA’s E>S Certification Exam”) and an afternoon session (“Translation Bash”).

Morning Session

This workshop will be a unique opportunity for MICATA members and others to translate an ATA retired passage, have it reviewed by ATA graders, and interact with those graders to find out many “inside” details about the ATA Certification Program. Participants will also learn what ATA graders are looking or in the Certification exam, what constitutes a hit and why is that other version an error, how many points off would it mean, and how to get bonus points.

Anybody can attend. However, prior registration is REQUIRED for this workshop. To benefit fully, you should translate the passage ahead of time and send your translation in to the graders so that they can include your hits and misses in the presentation. Here is where you will discover why something is an error and how much it will cost you. The errors will be shown anonymously. We may giggle at times, but it will not be at anybody’s expense. Giggles notwithstanding, this didactic exercise will be very rigorous and serious. This workshop is meant for people aspiring to be ATA-certified English into Spanish translators.

To order the passage to translate, please register for this workshop at www.micata.org, and then follow this link and complete the form after completing the registration process: https://goo.gl/forms/EFHDE4u85bW9r4Z62

We will send you the passage to the email address you provide.

The schedule will be as follows:

  • Mid-February: MICATA registration opens for this workshop and is limited to the first 30 registrants. (We will only be able to review translations received by March 10.)
  • March 8: Last day to request text to translate (We will ignore requests received after March 8.)
  • March 10: Last day to turn in translations (We will ignore translations received after March 10.)
  • March 10-23: Graders review translations
  • March 24: Workshop!

The graders will only review the first 24 translations received. Others may participate and will benefit from the workshop, but your translation hits and misses will not be part of the PowerPoint presentation. Translate the passage and you will know where YOU stand vis-à-vis the certification exam. So don’t delay. Request your passage and turn it in by March 3 (send your translation to micataspanish@gmail.com) to get the most out of this learning experience.

Rudy Heller and Diego Mansilla, the two graders, look forward to a day of collegial debate and to a mutually beneficial learning

Afternoon Session

MICATA’s First Ever E>S Translation Bash

What if you could get together with several other translators and work on a translation together in order to create the best possible translation? What if you could present your wonderful solution to a translation challenge only to have someone else come up with an even better solution? What if you could do this in a collegial, friendly, safe environment where your work will be both praised and critiqued, and explanations for one or the other will be provided?

What if we all hung our egos outside the door on the way in and picked them up on the way out?

At the Friday Conference workshop, from 1-3 pm, we will all gather to do exactly what is described above.

The best way to participate is to have translated ahead of time the paragraphs we will working on, so that we can all benefit from each other’s best efforts.

Request the text at https://goo.gl/forms/EFHDE4u85bW9r4Z62

Translate it, print it double-spaced and bring it with you to the Conference. Diego and Rudy, fellow ATA members, will join you and moderate the event to ensure that everybody has a chance to participate (or not). And be prompt! A valued translation-related book will be raffled right before we start, and a second rifa will take place right before we adjourn. A good time is guaranteed.  (return to top)

Rudy Heller is Colombian by birth. As he learned the craft of translation, Rudy worked for a translation agency, where he saw how not to run a translation business. When Rudy began translating, typewriters were the latest 150-year old technology. Even a single “teeny” error meant retyping the entire page. Careful reading of your drafts was imperative. Now as an E>S grader, he often has cause to wish that the candidate had reviewed his or her draft with care. If there is a takeaway from this bio, it’s the sentence before this one. (return to top)

Diego Mansilla teaches advanced translation courses at the University of Massachusetts Boston, where he is also director of the Translation Program. He is a grader for the American Translators Association Certification Exam (English into Spanish). A professional translator for over 15 years, Diego is a member of the Board of Directors of the New England Translators Association. (return to top)


The Craft of Note-Taking: Theory and Practice Length
Having a reliable note-taking system is key to interpreting effectively in the consecutive mode. That said, what works for one person may not make sense to another. Because note-taking is as individual as handwriting, it is best for interpreters to work on creating their own system of notes that combines basic elements: letters, symbols and spacing. The goal of this session is to expose participants to a “menu” of note-taking techniques while offering opportunities for practice to identify and perfect their individual note-taking style. This session will be offered in English for speakers of any language. (return to top)


Ernest Niño-Murcia
graduated from Brown University with a B.A. in Anthro-Linguistics and is currently a freelance legal interpreter and translator based in Des Moines, Iowa. As a state and federally-certified court interpreter, he has interpreted legal proceedings and prepared translations, transcriptions and expert witness reports/testimony for clients in the private and public sectors. Outside of court, he has interpreted for public figures such as Newt Gingrich, Archbishop Timothy Dolan and Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller. (return to top)


ATA Certification Exam Preparation

In this presentation, Diego Mansilla and Rudy Heller, ATA graders in the E>S Workgroup, will give an overview of the ATA Certification Program, why it is a good idea to seek and receive the ATA’s Certification, how exams are graded, what the graders look for (and what they’d rather not see), and many inside details about the exam. This presentation is valuable for all translators, regardless of your language pair. (return to top)

Rudy Heller is Colombian by birth. As he learned the craft of translation, Rudy worked for a translation agency, where he saw how not to run a translation business. When Rudy began translating, typewriters were the latest 150-year old technology. Even a single “teeny” error meant retyping the entire page. Careful reading of your drafts was imperative. Now as an E>S grader, he often has cause to wish that the candidate had reviewed his or her draft with care. If there is a takeaway from this bio, it’s the sentence before this one. (return to top)

Diego Mansilla teaches advanced translation courses at the University of Massachusetts Boston, where he is also director of the Translation Program. He is a grader for the American Translators Association Certification Exam (English into Spanish). A professional translator for over 15 years, Diego is a member of the Board of Directors of the New England Translators Association. (return to top)


Starting Up Your Own Business

Creating a successful business is all about launching your brand, and as such, is one of the most important investments you can make in your career. You need to create a memorable and distinctive brand that speaks to your unique selling points and resonates well with your target market. This presentation not only covers things to consider when selecting a legal form and catchy name that can grow with you, but also the importance of protecting your investment with a registered trademark.  The basic steps in the process will be explained including a rough estimate of the costs involved. This presentation will be useful for newcomers who want to start a business as well as established professionals who are interested in rebranding. (return to top)

Jeana M. Clark is an ATA-certified German>English translator, solopreneur, educator, and experienced non-profit leader. As a certified SDL Trados user, she loves sharing her CAT-tool passion with experienced colleagues and mentoring newbies. Always looking for a challenge, she is currently chairing two boards, the Iowa Interpreters and Translators Association and a non-profit, fair trade retailer in her hometown. When she is not teaching upper-level management and marketing courses at her alma mater, translating, or being “mom taxi,” you’ll probably find her at the gym teaching Zumba classes, enjoying mixed martial arts or driving her motorcycle. (return to top)


Planning Effective Translator Training

As university language programs focus more and more on skills graduates can use in their careers, translation (and interpreting) programs are popping up everywhere, giving rise to several questions, including: What do translator-in-training need to know? What skills must they possess? What tools should they master? Who should teach them and how? How can we know when they’re “ready for prime time”? In seeking answers, university faculty can benefit greatly from the expertise of professionals working in the T&I industry. In this session, the presenter will guide participants in a discussion of these and other questions in an effort to outline what an effective, competency-based program in translation should look like. Your experience can help shape programs that will ensure greater quality in our profession! (return to top)

Dr. Jason Jolley is an associate professor of Spanish at Missouri State University in Springfield where he regularly teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Spanish translation. He holds a Ph.D. in Spanish from The Pennsylvania State University. He has worked as a free-lance Spanish-English translator and was employed as an English-Portuguese translator with MZ Investor Relations in São Paulo for a number of years. He serves on the MICATA Board. (return to top)


Improving the Quality of Your Translation Business

A few tips from a seasoned translator: Quality Control on translated text by running spell check and having the computer read the translation back to you so you can also hear it; Snipping: Snipping and pasting information from the source text that does not need translation to reduce translation costs and possible errors; Invoicing & Keeping Track of Invoices: creating an invoice that focuses on information that the agency needs and getting paid on time; Counting Words in MS Word & Excel, etc.; Passwords: ways to remember effective passwords; Avoiding Translator Notes: the client considers you, the translator, to be the professional. (return to top)

John Matthews has been the MICATA Treasurer since 2005 with a brief hiatus, has been a member of MICATA for 30+ years, is a Life Member of the ATA, and is ATA-certified in Japanese > English translation.  He served 2 terms as MICATA president, 11 terms recently as MICATA treasurer, several terms as MICATA director, and periodically writes a column in the MICATA Monitor, Business 101 for Translators & Interpreters.  With an MBA from Thunderbird focusing on East Asia and a BS from Georgetown in Japanese and Applied Linguistics, he worked for 20 years at the Consulate General of Japan at Kansas City where duties included in-house translation.  He is a fulltime freelance translator focusing on legal, pharmaceutical, automotive, electronics and general business matters. (return to top)


Differences in Anime and Manga Translation

What is the difference in anime and manga translation? Though both are Japanese>English translating projects, the way to tackle them is different. In this presentation, I would like to talk a little bit about how I got into this field of translation as well as the variety of difficulties I have faced in both.

I have been a freelance translator since Oct, 2006. For manga, I have worked at TOKYOPOP until 2011 when they went out of business in the US, and currently work for Seven Seas Entertainment. For anime, I have worked with FUNimation since 2010. Though I was formally trained and work as a pharmacist, I continue my career in translation because I really enjoy the field. I mainly translate manga, at a rate of about a volume a month. I pick up anime translation projects on and off. I have worked both normal series and simulcasts. Personally I enjoy manga and anime a lot. I currently own 2000+ Japanese manga in my home.

Notes

Anime is Japanese hand-drawn or computer animation. The word is the abbreviated pronunciation of “animation” in Japanese, where this term references all animation.  Anime is a diverse art form with distinctive production methods and techniques that have been adapted over time in response to emergent technologies. It consists of an ideal story-telling mechanism, combining graphic art, characterization, cinematography, and other forms of imaginative and individualistic techniques.  The anime industry consists of over 430 production studios.
Manga are comics created in Japan or by creators in the Japanese language.  In Japan, people of all ages read manga. The medium includes works in a broad range of genres: action-adventure, business and commerce, comedy, detective, historical drama, horror, mystery, romance, science fiction and fantasy, sexuality, sports and games, and suspense, among others.

(return to top)

Angela Tamae Liu has been a freelance translator since October of 2006. For manga, she has worked at TOKYOPOP until 2011 when they went out of business in the US, and she currently works for Seven Seas Entertainment. For anime, she has worked with FUNimation since 2010. Though she was formally trained and works as a pharmacist, she continues her career in translation because she really enjoys the field. She mainly translates manga, at a rate of about a volume a month. She pick ups anime translation projects on and off. She has worked both normal series and simulcasts. She personally enjoys manga and anime a lot and has a collection of 2000+ Japanese manga at home. (return to top)


El signo lingüístico y la traducción: la relación entre el significante y el significado

This presentation, given in Spanish with Spanish and English examples, explores the concept of the linguistic sign (signifier and signified), and applies it to the analysis of polysemous lexical items in Spanish and English. It is shown that translation problems such as false cognates, are nothing more than specialized types of polysemous items, which can be resolved by looking for equivalent meanings rather than equivalent forms. The concept of primary and secondary meanings is presented as a tool for identifying the source text meaning and mapping it to an appropriate equivalent in the target language. (return to top)

Eva de Vallescar is an ATA-certified translator (English> Spanish). A native of Spain, Eva holds a master’s degree in public health and medical translation with the Universidad Jaume I (Valencia, Spain). She earned a B.A. in Communications from Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City. Eva began her career as a journalist, first as a print reporter and then as a TV writer/producer with CNN en Español. Currently, Eva works as a Health Communication Specialist with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where she began as a linguist back in 2008. In the last 2 years she has been “deployed” for 2 public health emergencies, Ebola and Zika virus outbreaks. She served as a Health Communication Specialist and a linguist, making sure the materials and the partnerships were culturally appropriate. (return to top)


Introduction to the Perioperative Process and Protocols for Medical Interpreters

This presentation will cover information regarding the perioperative process, environment, and circumstances, as well as interpreter protocols, followed by an introduction to terminology commonly used in surgical procedures. Interactive lecture presented in English. (return to top)

Wyman Borts, Jr. is a Certified Medical Interpreter and has served as professional interpreter in over 6,500 medical encounters of virtually every description, including hundreds of surgical/invasive procedures and the proceedings that encompass them. At present, he is a freelance translator and a full-time in-house interpreter and Translations Coordinator at Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines, Iowa. Within the medical context, he is skilled in all modes of interpreting as well as SPA< >ENG translation, proofreading, and editing. He is a member of ATA, MICATA, IITA, NATI, and IMIA, and a graduate of the DMACC ITR program. (return to top)


Getting Started in the T&I Industry

If you are a new interpreter or translator and you have wondered about certification, about how to market yourself, how to obtain references and referrals, how to stand your ground when faced with unrealistic expectations regarding deadlines, fees, etc., or how to organize your business (LLC, Sole Proprietor, Corporation, etc.) plan to attend this session offered by an experienced translator and an experienced interpreter. (return to top)

Gabby Doherty is from Mexico and has been a successful interpreter and translator since 2003 that she moved to Kansas. She has a Bachelor degree as a Montessori Educator; and a degree on Public Administration from the Mexico City “Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juana”. Her main expertise is on Spanish<>English, but she also speaks Italian and French. She has served as Secretary, Treasurer, and Board member of MICATA Board of Directors.She is a State Court Certified Interpreter, and she also has a Certificate as Medical Interpreter from the University of Arizona. She is continuously working on improving her skills, as well as interacting with colleagues to help improving our profession. She works as a court, medical, conferences, and phone interpreter. And as a translator she works mainly on legal and medical documents. (return to top)

Jean Marie Trujillo, an ATA-Certified Translator (Spanish>English) and a Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters (CCHI) Certified Healthcare InterpreterTM, stumbled into the world of professional translation and interpreting at the 2010 MICATA conference, and she hasn’t looked back since. A native of central Kansas, she double-majored in English and Spanish at Wheaton College (IL), completed her MA in Hispanic Literary Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and returned to Kansas to earn her PhD in Spanish with a focus on Latin American Literary and Cultural Studies at The University of Kansas. She has nearly fifteen years of experience teaching high school and college Spanish, and she looks forward to her new position teaching at Baker University next fall. She lives in Lawrence with her husband, two children, and one poodle. Between them, they have studied nine languages, but their poodle remains hopelessly monolingual. (return to top)


Translation and Transcreation for Public Health

Translating for Public Health requires awareness of multicultural diversity, command of the target language, and some negotiation skills to get a compromise text with the client. The process goes from translation to transcreation, especially when dealing with low-literacy, Spanish speaking populations. This presentation (in Spanish) will offer practical advice, examples, and tools for researching, negotiating the language and testing the message with the target audience. It will also discuss cases when terminology that is deemed politically correct at the same time conveys the message to the intended audience. (return to top)

Priscila Palomino Piper, M.A.E., M.A., is a Professor of Spanish and Program Chair of Interpretation and Translation at the Des Moines Area Community College. Professor Piper holds a B.A. in Communication/Linguistics; a second B.A. in Elementary Education with an ESL Endorsement; a M.A.E. in Reading and Language Arts with Bilingual Education; and a second M.A. in Letras Hispánicas through UNI in Spain. Former linguist/translator with Summer Institute of Linguistics International, Member of American Translators Association, Member of Iowa Interpreters and Translators Association, Member of American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese. (return to top)


Advanced Terminology Workshop for Medical Interpreters and Translators: Interpreting and Translating Terms Specific to Surgical/Invasive Procedures

Before every one of possibly thousands of distinct procedures classified as invasive is required the signature of a patient who is agreeing to something that is worded with precise and deliberate jargon. I will share my extensive personal glossary of surgical/invasive procedures (English-Spanish), and participants will practice interpreting, translating, and/or sight translating the official denominations of procedures as they are commonly written by physicians on legal Informed Consent forms for invasive procedures. This hands-on workshop is designed primarily for professionals working in Spanish, so discussion may be in English and/or Spanish, but participants working in any language pair are welcome. (return to top)

Wyman Borts, Jr. is a Certified Medical Interpreter and has served as professional interpreter in over 6,500 medical encounters of virtually every description, including hundreds of surgical/invasive procedures and the proceedings that encompass them. At present, he is a freelance translator and a full-time in-house interpreter and Translations Coordinator at Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines, Iowa. Within the medical context, he is skilled in all modes of interpreting as well as SPA< >ENG translation, proofreading, and editing. He is a member of ATA, MICATA, IITA, NATI, and IMIA, and a graduate of the DMACC ITR program. (return to top)


A Lucrative Sideline: Editing Non-Native English Scientific Writing

“The manuscript is poorly written and has too many grammatical and syntax errors. The results are very interesting from a practical standpoint but the paper needs thorough revision to make it suitable for publication in The Journal of Astounding Scientific Developments.” Enter the native English-speaking editor. This session will describe what sets this work apart from translation or from editing texts written by native speakers, how to price it and how to justify changes and handle authors’ egos when returning revised texts. We will conclude with a summary of what an efficient editing process might look like. (return to top)

Karen M. Tkaczyk, PhD, CT, FITI, works as a French into English freelance translator. Her translation work is highly specialized, focused on chemistry and its industrial applications. She holds an MChem in Chemistry with French (University of Manchester, UK), a Diploma in French and a PhD in Organic Chemistry (University of Cambridge, UK). She worked in the pharmaceutical industry in Europe, then after relocating in 1999, in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics in the US. She set up her translation practice in 2005. She lives in the Denver area with her French-British-American family. She tweets as @ChemXlator. (return to top)


Healthcare and Language Access

Providing meaningful and accessible language access to English Language Learners (ELL) is critical to addressing health disparities among underserved, minority populations. This presentation will introduce several key concerns in healthcare such as language barriers, health equity, social determinants of health, and discuss ways to address them. The presentation will also provide an overview of the medical interpreting, training, and certification. (return to top)

Susan Garrett, MPH, is a Teaching Assistant Professor with the Bachelor of Health Sciences program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City’s School of Nursing and Health Studies. Her areas of public health interest are addressing health disparities and language access among underserved populations. Throughout her career, Ms. Garrett has worked as a Spanish/English interpreter, case manager, program director, and higher education instructor. She has been a collaborator and leader in numerous health initiatives in the greater Kansas City area. Ms. Garrett is a native of Honduras and serves on several local nonprofit Board of Directors and committees. (return to top)


Can You Hear Me Now? Practical Aspects, Techniques and Modes of Interpretation

This interpreting panel will discuss different modes of interpretation (consecutive, simultaneous and sight translation) and how they are used in different settings (medical, court, business & government). With a focus on practical aspects, the panelists will compare and contrast interpreting techniques and tools commonly used in on-site and off-site interpretation (over the phone interpreting, video remote interpreting, conference interpreting), discuss advantages and disadvantages of each technique and present strategies that interpreters can use to increase quality and accuracy.

Among the aspects discussed in conjunction with the different modes of interpretation will be preparation (questions to ask a potential client, research before an assignment, space considerations), technologies and devices commonly used, as well as issues around personal health and management of time and workload.

Janja Pavetić-Dickey is a former U.N. staff translator and interpreter with over 20 years of experience. Since 2003 based in the U.S. she currently works as a translator, editor and translation verifier for various international organizations, government agencies and courts and also serves as a certification grader & interpreter rater. She is active in the ATA Slavic Languages Division, where she was a contributing editor of the division newsletter SlavFile and served two terms on the leadership council. (return to top)

Rosario Garriga is a native of Argentina who came to the United States 15 years ago. She is a federally certified court interpreter and a certified court interpreter for the Missouri State Courts. She holds a degree in Communication Sciences with a focus in journalism from the University of Buenos Aires and an M.A. in Print Journalism from Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts. She has worked as a freelance interpreter since 2008 and as an editor and translator since 2001. Most of her work these days is done in the federal courts, MO State Courts, attorney-client meetings and legal matters. However, she also has experience in conference, medical and business interpreting. Ms. Garriga is a member of MICATA, ATA and NAJIT. (return to top)

Birgit Scherer-Wiedmeyer has a degree in Interpretation (German, French, English) from FAS Germersheim, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz in Germany and an M.A. in English Literature and Composition from Southern Illinois University. After working as an in-house translator at Intergraph Corporation in Huntsville, AL, gathering experience in technical translations and localization, she moved to the Midwest where she has been working as an independent interpreter and translator. Her training in conference interpreting prepared her to navigate the many different assignments an interpreter might find herself in today, from booth interpreting during large gatherings, accompanying German legislators during political exchanges sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and the National Conference of State Legislators, video conferences for meetings between pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies, as well as webcast/VoIP interpreting.


Understanding Legalese in the Immigration Court

This program will focus on the basics of immigration in the family and removal defense arena so that interpreters might begin to understand the terminology associated with the practice. (return to top)

Angie Williams is an immigration and criminal defense attorney in Kansa City, Missouri. She is a solo practitioner and focuses her practice on family based immigration, asylum, and other humanitarian based immigration, removal defense, the immigration consequences of criminal activity and federal criminal defense. She is a member of a variety of community and professional organizations and speaks at conferences on immigration all over the country. (return to top)